Welcome

Welcome to the Association for Creatine Deficiencies (ACD), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the three Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes:

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Association for Creatine Deficiencies’ mission is to provide patient, family, and public education, to advocate for early diagnoses, and to promote and fund medical research for treatments and cures for Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS).

What is CCDS?

Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS) are a group of inborn errors of creatine metabolism including AGAT, CTD, and GAMT. Symptoms may include: intellectual delays, expressive speech and language delay, autistic-like behavior, hyperactivity, seizures, projectile vomiting in infancy, failure to thrive, and movement disorders.

Creatine helps supply energy to all cells in the body. It helps increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Creatine is produced in the liver, which makes it out of three amino acids: arginine, glycine and methionine. Most of our body's creatine (approximately 95%) is stored in the muscles that support the skeleton.

Creatine Community Blog

05Feb 2020

I wanted to talk a bit about something that my son said to me last year. This surely stuck out in my mind as important to share here. I’m sure a large number of readers are parents or caregivers of a loved one with a creatine deficiency. Some parents may have more than one child. And given that every family dynamic is different and each affected child is unique, this is just our own family’s experience that led to this topic. Continue reading

20Jan 2020

Pictured: Dr. Sonja Sucic from the Medical University of Vienna presenting on pharmacochaperoning at the Creatine Deficiency Workshop in Rotterdam in September 2019

Being a CCDS/CTD mom, I understand that it can be very easy to put a huge amount of hope in the idea of prospective treatments. The exciting news is that it’s not just a cliché to say that we can each make a difference. Our individual participation in the research process is vital and necessary to help researchers in the quest to find a cure for CTD. There are researchers around the world working on innovative new ideas for therapies that could really work to help our loved ones. Providing access to patient data is in our hands as parents and caregivers, and it is not an understatement to say that if we don’t do our job, the researchers can’t do their jobs. Continue reading