Welcome

Welcome to the Association for Creatine Deficiencies (ACD), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the three Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes:

2022 CCDS Scientific + Patient Symposium

The Association for Creatine Deficiencies’ mission is to promote and fund medical research for treatments and cures, provide patient, family, and public education, and advocate for early intervention through newborn screening for Cerebral Creatine
Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS).

What is CCDS?

Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS) are a group of inborn errors of creatine metabolism including AGAT, CTD, and GAMT. Symptoms may include: intellectual delays, expressive speech and language delay, autistic-like behavior, hyperactivity, seizures, projectile vomiting in infancy, failure to thrive, and movement disorders.

Creatine helps supply energy to all cells in the body. It helps increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Creatine is produced in the liver, which makes it out of three amino acids: arginine, glycine and methionine. Most of our body's creatine (approximately 95%) is stored in the muscles that support the skeleton.

Creatine Community Blog

16Dec 2021

Creatine Decoded: ACD-Funded CTD Drug Repurposing Fellowships Make Progress in Year One

Patient Samples from Coriell Biobank in Studies Seeking to Understand CTD Mutations & Explore Existing FDA-Approved Drugs as Potential Treatments

#CreatineDecoded is a quarterly educational essay series that sheds light on research relevant for Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS). The essays and interviews feature community contributors, often parents, who with the help of the ACD, explore in their own words the CCDS science you want to know more about.

Have a topic in mind? Send suggestions to Laura Trutoiu, ACD Director of Research auract@creatineinfo.org. Continue reading

29Nov 2021

By way of background, I am new to the CCDS community. Our 8-year-old son was diagnosed with CTD on 1 April 2021. Yes, April Fools Day, almost appropriate given the various false starts we had on the diagnosis path.

Up until that day in April, plenty of letters had been thrown our way – GDD, SPD, ID, ASD. But for me nothing really explained what was happening to our little man. It is easy to look back with hindsight and see the times we were dismissed by doctors, despite the red flags. We were close several times to maybe heading down the right path, but a doctor didn’t want to see us as a patient (our urine sample was elevated but not out of the realm of normal) or I was told we should just wait and see how he develops (only to also be told the early years are the most important for intervention, sigh). Continue reading