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Welcome to the Association for Creatine Deficiencies (ACD), an organization dedicated to the three Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes:
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The Association for Creatine Deficiencies is committed to providing patient, family, and public education to advocate for early intervention through newborn screening, and to promote and fund medical research for treatments and cures for Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes.

What is CCDS?

Creatine helps supply energy to all cells in the body. It helps increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Creatine is produced in the liver, which makes it out of three amino acids: arginine, glycine and methionine. Most of our body's creatine (approximately 95%) is stored in the muscles that support the skeleton.

Creatine Deficiency Syndromes are a group of inborn errors of creatine metabolism. In an individual, symptoms can include, but are not limited to: intellectual delays, expressive speech and language delay, autistic-like behavior, hyperactivity, seizures and movement disorders.

Latest News

20Sep 2016

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My son William (5), has CTD, and started big school for the first time this year. William has always been very passive, largely due to his temperament but also his lack of physical mobility (walking etc.) and significant expressive communication delays. Our main concern was that he would get overwhelmed and lost in a large class at a mainstream school due to his developmental delays but he had demonstrated such an enthusiasm for learning during the previous year (since he started walking) that he wouldn’t be challenged enough at a Special School. Continue reading

13Sep 2016

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Meet Max. Six years ago (almost seven), my life changed when he was born. He was my first child and the most amazing gift to me and my husband. When I was pregnant, everything seemed pretty normal. Clinically, the only thing that was wrong with my pregnancy was I had a single umbilical artery. It was not a major issue, except I had to have a few extra ultrasounds to ensure that the baby was developing and growing normally. In retrospect, I wonder if this was a symptom of the diagnosis we would receive a year and a half later.
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