Welcome

Welcome to the Association for Creatine Deficiencies (ACD), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the three Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes:

What is CCDS?

Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS) are a group of inborn errors of creatine metabolism including AGAT, CTD, and GAMT. Symptoms may include: intellectual delays, expressive speech and language delay, autistic-like behavior, hyperactivity, seizures, projectile vomiting in infancy, failure to thrive, and movement disorders.

Creatine helps supply energy to all cells in the body. It helps increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Creatine is produced in the liver, which makes it out of three amino acids: arginine, glycine and methionine. Most of our body's creatine (approximately 95%) is stored in the muscles that support the skeleton.

Creatine Community Blog

18May 2021

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Do you ever feel like all the work we do for our kiddos is not enough? How about feeling lost and deep deep pain when you see your child struggle every day? Lately, this is what has been running through my head. My family and I work so hard to help Caiden be successful with everyday life. Sometimes I feel deep down that it is still not enough. From the time we wake up to the time we go to bed I wonder if he will be okay without me by his side all the time. I feel so much pain for him when he has behavior after behavior after behavior on a daily basis. Recently, he decided that he no longer wants to go to school. I now need help just to get him loaded into the car. To top it all off, every day, like clockwork, we receive texts, phone calls, and emails from his teacher and principal with behavior reports. Getting these is the worst feeling in the world. How do we know if what we are doing is hurting our children or helping them? Continue reading

30Apr 2021

The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) recently hosted a webinar on the “Rare Sibling Experience.” As the mother of two children, one who is diagnosed with Creatine Transporter Deficiency (CTD) and one who is not, this resonated with me and I was very curious to hear from experts on the topic. Questions about how to handle the experience of my daughter as the sibling of a child with a rare disease often swirl around in my head. My son Cadman is 6-years-old and has CTD. My daughter Emma is 3. Because of their young ages, most of my concerns are about the future, how this will affect Emma as she grows up, and wanting to make sure that as their parents, we are communicating in a healthy, constructive way. The webinar covers communication tips for siblings of various ages (very different for a preschooler vs. a teenager!). Continue reading