“Seasons” -Nathan

18May 2021

 width=

Do you ever feel like all the work we do for our kiddos is not enough? How about feeling lost and deep deep pain when you see your child struggle every day? Lately, this is what has been running through my head. My family and I work so hard to help Caiden be successful with everyday life. Sometimes I feel deep down that it is still not enough. From the time we wake up to the time we go to bed I wonder if he will be okay without me by his side all the time. I feel so much pain for him when he has behavior after behavior after behavior on a daily basis. Recently, he decided that he no longer wants to go to school. I now need help just to get him loaded into the car. To top it all off, every day, like clockwork, we receive texts, phone calls, and emails from his teacher and principal with behavior reports. Getting these is the worst feeling in the world. How do we know if what we are doing is hurting our children or helping them? Continue reading

30Apr 2021

The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) recently hosted a webinar on the “Rare Sibling Experience.” As the mother of two children, one who is diagnosed with Creatine Transporter Deficiency (CTD) and one who is not, this resonated with me and I was very curious to hear from experts on the topic. Questions about how to handle the experience of my daughter as the sibling of a child with a rare disease often swirl around in my head. My son Cadman is 6-years-old and has CTD. My daughter Emma is 3. Because of their young ages, most of my concerns are about the future, how this will affect Emma as she grows up, and wanting to make sure that as their parents, we are communicating in a healthy, constructive way. The webinar covers communication tips for siblings of various ages (very different for a preschooler vs. a teenager!). Continue reading

01Mar 2021

I had just poured myself a cup of coffee and settled in for the 2-hour Ultragenyx Study, feeling I might have something to offer having been in the CTD world for 20 years, when the second question knocked the wind out of me: What is your greatest fear for the future? It happens every time that question is asked of me. It seems that the fear for the future is always lying just beneath the surface like an alligator waiting to strike. I immediately lost my ability to speak and raised my index finger, asking for a moment to gather myself. I’m surprised by my sudden and intense emotional response to that question, and I’m embarrassed. The ladies interviewing me are gracious and give me the time I need. I just met them, but I feel that maybe they have kids, too. Maybe they understand. I take a deep breath and attempt to convey how I feel, how I worry that my son will be mistreated, neglected, or abused without my vigilance.  I worry who is going to wipe his butt when he, a grown man, uses the bathroom. Or who is going to cut his food small enough so he doesn’t choke. Who is going to draw him away from his puzzles or iPad long enough to interact with real people from time to time? I worry he won’t understand where I went when I’m gone and that he’ll think I left him on purpose. I worry he won’t feel loved. Continue reading

20Jan 2021

We are very fortunate in our state to have scholarships for children who qualify for an IEP but don’t attend public schools. This helps with funds for a visiting Intervention Specialist (special ed teacher) as well as home-based therapies. Sonnet’s health crisis has resolved greatly since she was diagnosed and began treatment for GAMT. However, her neurologist and I vividly remember when she was dealing with fifty-plus seizures a day. It isn’t certain if a serious illness could cause another downward spiral, so our family has chosen to largely quarantine during flu season. This was extended and amplified during the pandemic. Continue reading

31Dec 2020

This essay was written by Laura Trutoiu, ACD Director of Research, with support from Erin Coller, ACD Director of Communications, and Sangeetha Iyer, ACD Scientific Advisor. 

#CreatineDecoded is a quarterly educational essay series that sheds light on research relevant for Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS). The essays feature community contributors, often parents, who, with the help of the ACD, explore in their own words the CCDS science you want to know more about. Have a topic in mind? Send suggestions to Laura Trutoiu, ACD Director of Research [email protected]

When we got Rohan’s Creatine Transporter Deficiency (CTD) genetic diagnosis mid-2017 he was two and a half and had barely started to walk. Though sweet and loving, Rohan wasn’t using words and wasn’t quite doing what other two year olds do. It was a long road to a diagnosis and finding the genetic cause was a blow and a sigh of relief. I got the call at work and jumped out of an ordinary meeting into a brave new world full of genes and mutations.
Continue reading

09Dec 2020

It’s 3 AM and I can’t sleep. Again.

I came across videos yesterday of Sam completing tasks for the learning program we were doing for a while (Relationship Development Intervention-RDI), and I was reminded, once again, how little we really engage with him now, how few activities he engages in. It bothers me. Continue reading

28Oct 2020

This essay was written by Celeste Graham, ACD Director of Education, with the support of Sangeetha Iyer, ACD Scientific Advisor. 

#CreatineDecoded is a quarterly educational essay series that sheds light on research relevant for Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes (CCDS). The essays feature community contributors, often parents, who with the help of the ACD, explore in their own words the CCDS science you want to know more about. Have a topic in mind? Send suggestions to Laura Trutoiu, ACD Director of Research [email protected].

Dr. Jonathan Schlebach, PhD (Indiana University-Bloomington) participated in the ACD’s 2020 Virtual Conference and gave an informative talk on the “Classification of the Molecular Defects Associated with Pathogenic Variants of the SLC6A8 Creatine Transporter”. ACD Director of Research, Laura Trutoiu, noticed a recent informative publication from Schlebach’s lab and invited him to attend the 2020 Virtual Conference. “It has been a pleasant surprise to learn about all of the exciting, ongoing research in the ACD community!” Schlebach noted. As a new member of the CCDS community, we are thankful that he has been willing to jump right in with presenting some of his lab’s research findings. Read on to learn a little more about Schlebach, his lab, and his research as it relates to CCDS!

Continue reading

07Oct 2020

I recently joined the ACD as the new Programs Coordinator, and as part of my orientation experience, I had the amazing opportunity to participate in the 2020 Global Genes LIVE virtual conference. This event was not only educational but incredibly inspirational. I learned so much and came away from the experience with a greater understanding of why we do what we do at the ACD. I would love to share some of my highlights and takeaways with you!
Continue reading

02Sep 2020

Pioneer. Verb. A person who is among the first to develop or be the first to use or apply (a new method, area of knowledge, or activity). Parent or grandparent of an individual with special needs, do you feel like a pioneer? Well, you are!

Continue reading

07Sep 2016

Family Picture

Well friends, the end of summer is again upon us.  Children are heading back to school and hopefully, soon the cool air of fall will again give us respite from the stifling summer heat. In our family, three of our boys are returning to their studies after a few short months of summer vacation. 

This return to school is an exciting time for us, as we welcome new experiences and try to begin the process of planning for the fall and winter to come.  Aside from school starting, we have had a few other things going on since I last posted.  The hub and mainstay of our family, I call her my wife, had to undergo a medical procedure that has pretty much removed her ability to lift or bend for the last four weeks and a few more to come.  At the same time, I have had the opportunity to participate in a full-time education program, which I have been putting off for several years.  Oh, and while all this was going on, we still have had the usual mix of staffing changes, appointments, and everyday fevers and illnesses.Waiting in Stroller

I bring all this up to say that our usually calm late summer and early fall season has turned into something more reflective of chaos than the Pumpkin Spice Latte filled serenity(ish) world we expected, and that is ok.  I think as an individual and as a family we are learning to accept that these seasons will come and go, especially if you read my post from a few months ago. Despite this idea of becoming more comfortable as time goes on, I still notice that I keep getting asked “how we do it” by just about everyone who has heard about our unique blessings. I still have not really responded with the answer that is in my heart as first and foremost I know that this question usually comes out of true compassion. If I were to give some interested new friend my honest response it would be, “how could we not do it?”.  If there was a way to avoid all the craziness I have not found it, nor have I really had the time or felt the desire to look.  

My family, just like yours I am sure, has seasons in it that vary as widely as the weather in (insert your area) does. Although we try to prepare for the seasons that we know are coming, to prevent panicking over the equivalent of a predictable snowfall in January, we realize that CTD has created unique aspects in our lives that require us to be ready to make the best out of an unexpected snowfall on the fourth of July as well! After all, I think that the best way to be prepared for the upcoming changes is to accept that those changes will happen, usually when we least expect them.

Leave a Reply

 

Disclaimer: All thoughts and ideas expressed in the Creatine Community Blog represent the individual blog contributor's opinions and not those of the Association for Creatine Deficiencies. The ideas expressed in the Creatine Community Blog, and any other locations on the creatineinfo.org website, should never be construed as medical advice, even if the information relates to actual health care experiences of the contributor. Individuals should always follow the instructions of their physician and make no changes to their care unless instructed to do so by their physician.